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IMAGES IN CLINICAL NEONATOLOGY
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 43-44

Type 1 Peter's anomaly-a cause for corneal opacity in a neonate


1 Consultant Neonatologist, Head Division of Neonatology, Manipal Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Fellow, Department of Neonatology, Manipal Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication8-Feb-2017

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Iyer Harohalli Venkatesh
Consultant Neonatolgist, Head Division of Neonatology, Manipal Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2249-4847.199762

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How to cite this article:
Venkatesh IH, Purushotham S. Type 1 Peter's anomaly-a cause for corneal opacity in a neonate. J Clin Neonatol 2017;6:43-4

How to cite this URL:
Venkatesh IH, Purushotham S. Type 1 Peter's anomaly-a cause for corneal opacity in a neonate. J Clin Neonatol [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Dec 9];6:43-4. Available from: http://www.jcnonweb.com/text.asp?2017/6/1/43/199762

A 28-week-old preterm neonate born by emergency cesarean section was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. On examination, the baby was found to have opacity in the right cornea. Systemic examination was un remarkable. There was no birth trauma and intrauterine infection was ruled out. A clinical diagnosis of Type-1 Peter's anomaly was made, characterized by central corneal opacity with iridocorneal adhesion without lens involvement.

Peter's anomaly is a disease, wherein, the corneal opacity is due to dysgenesis of the anterior segment. The anomaly is bilateral in 80% of cases. In some cases, unilateral opacity is seen as demonstrated in our case [Figure 1] and [Figure 2]. Most of the cases are sporadic. Mutations involving PAX-6, PITX-2, and CYP1B1 gene is associated in some patients with Peter's anomaly.[1],[2] Amblyopia and glaucoma are the known complications of this anomaly. Penetrating keratoplasty is advocated in children with corneal opacification at the risk of developing amblyopia.[3],[4]
Figure 1: Normal left cornea

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Figure 2: Right corneal opacity

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Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Aliferis K, Marsal C, Pelletier V, Doray B, Weiss MM, Tops CM, et al. A novel nonsense B3GALTL mutation confirms Peters plus syndrome in a patient with multiple malformations and Peters anomaly. Ophthalmic Genet 2010;31:205-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Zhang X, Tong Y, Xu W, Dong B, Yang H, Xu L, et al. Two novel mutations of the PAX6 gene causing different phenotype in a cohort of Chinese patients. Eye (Lond) 2011;25:1581-9.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Basdekidou C, Dureau P, Edelson C, De Laage De Meux P, Caputo G. Should unilateral congenital corneal opacities in Peters' anomaly be grafted? Eur J Ophthalmol 2011;21:695-9.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Najjar DM, Christiansen SP, Bothun ED, Summers CG. Strabismus and amblyopia in bilateral Peters anomaly. J AAPOS 2006;10:193-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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