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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 157-161

Meconium-stained amniotic fluid as a potential risk factor for perinatal asphyxia: A single-center experience


1 Department of Pediatrics, Sri Aurobindo Medical College and Post Graduate Institute, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India
2 Department of Medicine, Sri Aurobindo Medical College and Post Graduate Institute, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Veerendra Mehar
Department of Pediatrics, Sri Aurobindo Medical College and Post Graduate Institute, Indore - 453 111, Madhya Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2249-4847.191246

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Background: The aim of this study was to find out immediate fetal outcome in meconium-stained amniotic fluid in relation to perinatal asphyxia. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study includes medical records of all neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) between September 2014 and July 2015. The variables reviewed are age, sex, weight, mode of delivery, gestational age, presence of meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) and perinatal asphyxia. Results: Out of 399 total admissions in NICU, 62.4% were male babies and remaining 37.6% were female babies. Of the total 6.8% were cases of MAS, making females (10.7%) more prone compared to male (4.4%) while perinatal asphyxia came out to be 11.5%, making male (12%) more prone than female (10.7%). Postterm (odds ratio [OR] =3.50 [CI: 0.39-31.42]) and term (OR = 2.58 [CI: 1.16, 5.75]) babies were having more risk of developing MAS compared to preterm (P < 0.01). Postterm (OR = 9.15 [CI: 1.91-43.75]) and term (OR = 2.67 [CI: 1.41-5.08]) babies were having more risk of developing perinatal asphyxia compared to preterm (P < 0.01). MAS babies are having 6.62 (CI: 2.85-15.38) times more risk of developing perinatal asphyxia (P < 0.01). Conclusion: The management of MAS, which is a perinatal problem, requires a well concerted and coordinated action by the obstetrician and pediatrician. Prompt and efficient delivery room management can minimize the sequelae of aspirated meconium and decrease the chance of perinatal asphyxia.


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